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joaquin's picture

Drupal vs. WordPress? Who Cares?! They Are Both Open Source.

Every week I hear about someone choosing WordPress over Drupal (or vice versus). While there are certainly differences between the two platforms, they are more alike than people typically care to admit: Both are used as content management systems. Both are written in PHP Both are optimized for the LAMP stack. Both are free open source. Both are supported by massive and highly active communities Both are significantly better than the traditional closed source alternatives that are still entrenched in the enterprise. For the visually inclined the overlap of just the LAMP stack is shown here: Read More…

dan's picture

DrupalCon 2014 Call for Sessions!

It's that time again! DrupalCon is right around the corner and it's time to submit your talk. The theme this year is Drupal 8 and that means that we'll be covering things like Symphony, Twig, and the other new components that make up Drupal 8. Do you have a talk about how to use the new templating system? Want to share how OOP works in Drupal 8? Submit your session now! See you in Austin! The call for content ends March 7th at 11:59PM Austin local time (UTC -6). Read More…

tward's picture

Reliably Monitoring MySQL Replication

Replication is a wonderful thing for your clients. Having a 'hot spare' of their database(s) for redundancy, or being able to off-load read operations from the main database to increase performance, giving your client peace-of-mind about their data and application. I won't go into setting up MySQL Replication; there are more than a few guides on that already out there (here's the official documentation). Once you do have Replication running, you need to make sure that it remains running, reliably, all the time. How best to accomplish this? The Way Monitoring Had Been The typical method is to use SLAVE STATUS to look at information about the setup. Read More…

steve's picture

Metal Toad Project Manager Profile: Steve Winters

As part of our project manager application process, we ask applicants to respond to a number of questions about themselves focused on their approach and philosophy when it comes to project management. We figured that if we were going to put applicants up to those questions, we should respond to them as well! Adam and Katie have already been profiled, and now it's on to Steve, our newest addition to the PM team! Read More…

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adam's picture

Metal Toad Templates Part 2: Our Agile Burndown Google Spreadsheet

Here’s the first template post in this series, following my opinion piece on when to use a PM tool versus creating your own spreadsheet. True to our nature as proponents of open source software, we also enjoy opening up our process a bit. Up today is our burndown spreadsheet built in Google Docs. It’s dead simple and does only one thing, but it does it quickly and efficiently. As we win more and more projects at a larger scale where an Agile approach makes sense, we’re communicating progress via burndown charts more regularly. Read More…

adam's picture

Metal Toad Templates Part 1: Spreadsheets versus PM Tools

I’m starting a new series dedicated to sharing project management templates we’ve created and frequently use at Metal Toad. We use various tools on projects (Harvest, Jira, Basecamp, Trello, Invision, etc.), but like many others we’ve talked to, we still use plenty of spreadsheets and documents to improve project tracking and documentation. Yes, there are tools that accomplish what we’re looking to do, but many don’t do it well enough, and others do it too well. Sometimes a spreadsheet is just right. Using a spreadsheet over a similar tool makes sense based upon the overall value provided by each based on the variables below: Read More…

Jason's picture

Ruby, Drupal and a tadpole's swimlane

Entering the pond As a tadpole in the Metal Toad pond, I had my fair share of anxiety in my first few weeks as a developer but from day one every member of the team made me feel welcome and has always been there to help.There is a strong sense of camaraderie that crosses over into our work ethic and collaboration. We all take pride in the work we do and that became apparent to me right away in my first few weeks here. I feel like I am part of more than just a development team, I feel like I am part of an extended family. I can't imagine being more set up for success than I am right now. It's a great and motivating feeling! Read More…

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