code ownership

A Sense of Software Craftsmanship

When leaders view software development as an assembly line, they expose themselves to a lot of pain: overages, missed timelines, and disappointed customers. These consequences are the painful ones that earn the attention of management. However, there is a graver consequence: your master craftspeople are ashamed of their work. This shame is viral - the next developer that maintains this code will also become defeated, and the shame will pass down, developer by developer, until the business can no longer afford the lost productivity and buys something new.

A beginner's guide to GIT BISECT - The process of elimination

The slowest, most tedious way of finding a bad git commit is something we've all done before. You checkout some old commit, make sure the broken code isn't there, then checkout a slightly newer commit, check again, and repeat over and over until you find the flawed commit.

Using git bisect is a much better way. It's like a little wizard that walks you through recent commits, asks you if they are good or bad, and narrows down the broken commit. In this blog post, I encourage you to create a fresh git repository and walk through each step. Hopefully, you'll gain an intrinsic understanding of git bisect by the end of the exercise.