cms

Full Stack Basics for the Non-Developer (The Complete Post)

Let's visualize and talk about the "full stack" of web development. From a developer's standpoint, we're probably talking about the layers of code involved in delivering a website to an end user. But let's back up further for a moment and just talk about a stack of things.

Full Stack Basics for the Non-Developer, Part 2

Here's part 2 in the series explaining our "full stack" at a high level. If you missed part 1, make sure to give it a read first. If you prefer, you can read the long-form post with all the content in one. Again, feel free to call me on any technicalities or suggest changes/additions in the comments!

Full Stack part 2

Why More People Select WordPress than Drupal to Build Websites

First off, Drupal has had a great year and a great quarter. According to builtwith.com Drupal is second among all Content Management Systems at 13.75% of the top 10K websites and has added ~250K new website this quarter. That said, the number one CMS (WordPress) is at 42% of the market and according to the same source has added 5MM (yes, 5 million) websites this quarter. Here's the graph:

pie chart of CMS usage

Open Source is the New Microsoft

When I was starting out in the web industry back before the turn of century, open source options were available but were often ruled out as risky business investments. At the time, they were relatively feature poor (compared to enterprise solutions) and a bet on the wrong technology could potentially cost someone their job. It was around this time that I heard the phrase "no one gets fired for choosing Microsoft", but times have changed.

New Competition: Will WordPress and Drupal Learn to Share?

After years of building and publishing on them, I'd love to say I knew CMS frameworks like Drupal and WordPress would be this huge. In truth they got this popular because of their great open-source communities; both of which I'm trying to participate and contribute to more. Why? Because closed platforms like SquareSpace and Adobe's content platform are rushing ahead without having to worry about backward compatibility like WordPress and Drupal does. These newer, closed systems insulate users from the backend and abstract away many of the same complexities WordPress.org and WordPress.com solved. They can push forward faster with newer, cleaner, “from-scratch” user-experiences because they don't need to maintain compatibility like "the big PHP" CMS's.

Why to Drop your Custom CMS for Drupal

A little background.

When I started as a PHP Developer, I took a look at a bunch of different content management systems and frameworks, both open source and licensed solutions. I found that most of them seemed either overly complex or to difficult to customize. So when my employer asked me to write a proprietary in-house CMS, I jumped at the chance. It wasn't too long, and I had created a CMS that had just the features our clients wanted and a simple to use interface.

The Framework is dead. Long live the CMS.

If you don't know already, the framework is dead. That is to say, unless you have money to burn, frameworks like Zend, CakePHP, Django, Struts, .NET, and even Rails should not be considered as a foundation for building anything but the most unique and game changing websites*. The age of the framework for building websites is gone and it has been replaced by the open-source CMS or Content Management System.

Ready for transformation?