Javascript

Missing a Development Tool? Make Your Own!

Do you ever wish you had a certain tool, but you don’t have the budget for it, or it doesn’t even exist? I’m here to tell you: you can build it!

And as I discovered, the build can give you more than that tool you want—it can also be a great way to strengthen your skills, add value for your teammates, and even have a bit of fun.

The problem

BackstopJS Part Deux: Javascript Config and Makefile

I’ve written previously about my setup for BackstopJS (which I’m still excited to say is the creator-recommended tutorial for V2 of the package!). Since that article, I’ve switched from JSON to Javascript configuration, and added a Makefile as the main method of running visual regression tests with BackstopJS.

Using Serverless Config to Deploy an AWS CloudWatch Dashboard

My team’s most recent project has been really interesting - it’s a JavaScript project that includes using the Serverless Framework to deploy a variety of AWS Lambda Functions (e.g. uploading to S3 buckets and making requests to the API that we built). Part of my responsibility as QA Engineer was to set up a CloudWatch dashboard in AWS. Dashboards can be created manually in the CloudWatch service, but I wanted to create the dashboards through code deploys.

On Javascript

So...Javascript...

I've been thinking a lot about Javascript over the last few months. And not the "How can we architect a better system" type of thinking, but the "Why do people still write this?" type thinking. I guess it only recently occurred to me, it seems crazy that people still think its a good idea. Javascript is the car you bought in 1992 that you drove until 2015, each week a new part breaking, each week a new "solution" to that broken part being glued on.  It's 2016, I think I've finally come to terms with the idea that it's time to upgrade.

A YAGNI ReactJS Architecture: Part 3

Review

In Part 2 (http://www.metaltoad.com/blog/yagni-react-architecture-part-2), we discussed configuring Director to listen for route changes and run a route handler (conveniently all Director does (and why I love Director)). In this post, we will finally do some React writing. Not a lot. But some. This series is intended to be about React architecture, not necessarily React code creation (which maybe maybe we’ll do later).

A YAGNI ReactJS Architecture: Part 1

The Why

React is awesome. 11/10. In my opinion, the best UI library currently in the ecosystem. It streamlines UI componentization, reusability, UI state, and a ton of other client side headaches devs have been mitigating for years. React's greatest flaw, in my opinion, isn't even really a React flaw as much as a "new stuff hype" flaw, where the infrastructure surrounding React changes almost hourly and can be extremely difficult to keep up with. What libraries are required, which ones will make devs' lives easier, which will bring performance gains?  

Full Stack Basics for the Non-Developer, Part 3

Here's part #3 in the series explaining our "full stack" at a high level. If you missed part 1, or part 2 make sure to give those a read first. If you prefer, you can read the long-form post with all the content in one. Again, feel free to call me on any technicalities or suggest changes/additions in the comments!

Ready for transformation?