iOS

6 Design Tips for iOS and Android

Recently I've been designing a few mobile apps. The first app was designed from scratch for both iOS and Android. The other was taking a pre-existing iOS app and translating the design and UX to be more suited for Android. It's been an interesting process that has taught me a lot about the differences and similarities of the two different platforms. I've also been discussing, sharing, and working directly with both iOS and Android developers to create the best experience on both platforms. I’d like to share some tips I’ve learned.
 

WatchOS 2 Animations with Completion Blocks

Now that WatchOS 2.0 is released we have more than just frame animations in the SDK. It now has animation support for moving things around on-screen. It's not terribly powerful because it is based on their layout engine. The layout engine organizes content by Group, Image and Alignment. If it were D&D alignment it would be Lawful Neutral, which doesn't sound fun, but it's not even that much fun; it's alignment to a parent element (left, right, top, bottom). Many properties are animatable, though, including alignment, width/height, background color/image, color and tint color.

Metal Toad Goes to San Francisco (Part 1)

This past week, a couple of us at Metal Toad traveled down to San Francisco for WWDC and AltConf. There were a ton of great sessions and presentations throughout the week, and we’d like to share the best of the best with you.

The videos directly from Apple are already available, the videos from AltConf aren’t yet, but we’ll post part 2 when they become available.

iOS: A Quick Script to Retain Your Sanity With CoreSimulator Folders.

Note: This is outdated. See our update for Xcode 7

When Xcode 6 was released this past fall, Apple switched from a relatively sane folder structure to a completely opaque GUID based structure. For debugging purposes, it’s often nice to be able to browse your app’s file structure in the simulator without resorting to NSLogging a device ID.

Continuous Delivery for Enterprise on iOS

In part two (part one) of a series on iOS automation, we'll discuss continuous deployment. Thankfully, due to wonderful tools like Hockey, it’s never been easier. In this post, we’ll go over installing the native Hockey app on your server, configuring its associated command line utility, and setting up a post-build trigger that will automatically upload your XcodeBots build and release it on Hockey.

Ready for transformation?